Wiring Routing and Installation – Powerplant Electrical Systems

in Engine Ignition and Electrical Systems

Electrical Wiring Installation

The following recommended procedures for installing aircraft electrical wiring are typical of those used on most types of aircraft. For purposes of this discussion, the following definitions are applicable:

  1. Open wiring—any wire, wire group, or wire bundle not enclosed in conduit.
  2. Wire group—two or more wires in the same location, tied together to identity the group.
  3. Wire bundle—two or more wire groups tied together because they are going in the same direction at the point where the tie is located. The bundle facilitates maintenance.
  4. Electrically protected wiring—wires that include in the circuit protections against overloading, such as fuses, circuit breakers, or other limiting devices.
  5. Electrically unprotected wiring—wires, generally from generators to main bus distribution points, that do not have protection, such as fuses, circuit breakers, or other current-limiting devices.

Routing and Installation

All wiring should be installed so that it is mechanically and electrically sound and neat in appearance. Whenever practicable, wires and bundles should be routed parallel with, or at right angles to, the stringers or ribs of the area involved. An exception to this general rule is the coaxial cables, which are routed as directly as possible.

The wiring must be adequately supported throughout its length. A sufficient number of supports must be provided to prevent undue vibration of the unsupported lengths. All wires and wire groups should be routed and installed to protect them from:

  1. Chafing or abrasion;
  2. High temperature;
  3. Being used as handholds, or as support for personal belongings and equipment;
  4. Damage by personnel moving within the aircraft;
  5. Damage from cargo stowage or shifting;
  6. Damage from battery acid fumes, spray, or spillage; and
  7. Damage from solvents and fluids.

Protection Against Chafing

Wires and wire groups should be installed so that they are protected against chafing or abrasion in those locations where contact with sharp surfaces or other wires would damage the insulation. Damage to the insulation can cause short circuits, malfunctions, or inadvertent operation of equipment. Cable clamps should be used to support wire bundles at each hole through a bulkhead. [Figure 4-88] If wires come closer than ¼ inch to the edge of the hole, a suitable grommet is used in the hole. [Figure 4-89]

Figure 4-88. Cable clamp at bulkhead hole.

Figure 4-88. Cable clamp at bulkhead hole.

Sometimes, it is necessary to cut nylon or rubber grommets to facilitate installation. In these instances, after insertion, the grommet can be secured in place with general purpose cement. The slot should be at the top of the hole, and the cut should be made at an angle of 45° to the axis of the wire bundle hole.

Figure 4-89. Cable clamp and grommet at bulkhead hole.

Figure 4-89. Cable clamp and grommet at bulkhead hole.

Protection Against High Temperature

To prevent insulation deterioration, wires should be kept separate from high-temperature equipment, such as resistors, exhaust stacks, heating ducts. The amount of separation is usually specified by engineering drawings. Some wires must be run through hot areas. These wires must be insulated with high-temperature rated material, such as asbestos, fiberglass, or Teflon. Additional protection is also often required in the form of conduits. A low-temperature insulated wire should never be used to replace a high-temperature insulated wire.

Many coaxial cables have soft plastic insulation, such as polyethylene, that is especially subject to deformation and deterioration at elevated temperatures. All high-temperature areas should be avoided when installing these cables.

Additional abrasion protection should be given to asbestos wires enclosed in conduit. Either conduit with a high temperature rubber liner should be used or asbestos wires can be enclosed individually in high-temperature plastic tubes before being installed in the conduit.

Protection Against Solvents and Fluids

Avoid installing wires in areas where they are subjected to damage from fluids. Wires should not be placed in the lowest four inches of the aircraft fuselage, except those that must terminate in that area. If there is a possibility that wiring without a protective nylon outer jacket may be soaked with fluids, plastic tubing should be used to protect it. This tubing should extend past the exposure area in both directions and should be tied at each end. If the wire has a low point between the tubing ends, provide a 1⁄8-inch drainage hole. [Figure 4-90] This hole should be punched into the tubing after the installation is complete and the low point definitely established by using a hole punch to cut a half circle. Care should be taken not to damage any wires inside the tubing when using the punch.

Figure 4-90. Drainage hole in low point of tubing.

Figure 4-90. Drainage hole in low point of tubing.

Wire should never be routed below a battery. All wires in the vicinity of a battery should be inspected frequently. Wires discolored by battery fumes should be replaced.

Protection of Wires in Wheel Well Area

Wires located in wheel wells are subject to many additional hazards, such as exposure to fluids, pinching, and severe flexing in service. All wire bundles should be protected by sleeves of flexible tubing securely held at each end. There should be no relative movement at points where flexible tubing is secured. These wires and the insulating tubing should be inspected carefully at very frequent intervals, and wires or tubing should be replaced at the first sign of wear. There should be no strain on attachments when parts are fully extended, but slack should not be excessive.

Routing Precautions

When wiring must be routed parallel to combustible fluid or oxygen lines for short distances, as much separation as possible should be maintained. The wires should be on a level with, or above, the plumbing lines. Clamps should be spaced so that if a wire is broken at a clamp, it will not contact the line. Where a 6-inch separation is not possible, both the wire bundle and the plumbing line can be clamped to the same structure to prevent any relative motion. If the separation is less than 2 inches but more than 1⁄2 inch, two cable clamps back to back can be used to maintain a rigid separation only and not for support of the bundle. [Figure 4-91] No wire should be routed so that it is located nearer than ½ inch to a plumbing line, nor should a wire or wire bundle be supported from a plumbing line that carries flammable fluids or oxygen. Wiring should be routed to maintain a minimum clearance of at least 3 inches from control cables. If this cannot be accomplished, mechanical guards should be installed to prevent contact between wiring and control cables.

Figure 4-91. Separation of wires from plumbing lines.

Figure 4-91. Separation of wires from plumbing lines.

Installation of Cable Clamps

Cable clamps should be installed with regard to the proper mounting angle. [Figure 4-92] The mounting screw should be above the wire bundle. It is also desirable that the back of the cable clamp rest against a structural member where practicable. Figure 4-93 shows some typical mounting hardware used in installing cable clamps. Be sure that wires are not pinched in cable clamps. Where possible, mount them directly to structural members. [Figure 4-94]

Figure 4-92. Proper mounting angle for cable clamps.

Figure 4-92. Proper mounting angle for cable clamps.

Figure 4-93. Typical mounting hardware for cable clamps.

Figure 4-93. Typical mounting hardware for cable clamps.

Figure 4-94. Mounting cable clamps to structure.

Figure 4-94. Mounting cable clamps to structure.

Clamps can be used with rubber cushions to secure wire bundles to tubular structures. [Figure 4-95] Such clamps must fit tightly but should not be deformed when locked in place.

Figure 4-95. Installing cable clamps to tubular structure.

Figure 4-95. Installing cable clamps to tubular structure.

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