Turbine Engine Inlet Systems (Part Two)

in Induction and Exhaust Systems

Divided-Entrance Duct

The requirements of high-speed, single- or twin-engine military aircraft, in which the pilot sits low in the fuselage and close to the nose, render it difficult to employ the older type single-entrance duct, which is not used on modern aircraft. Some form of a divided duct, which takes air from either side of the fuselage, has become fairly widely used. This divided duct can be either a wing-root inlet or a scoop at each side of the fuselage. [Figure 3-25] Either type of duct presents more problems to the aircraft designer than a single-entrance duct because of the difficulty of obtaining sufficient airscoop area without imposing prohibitive amounts of drag. Internally, the problem is the same as that encountered with the singleentrance duct: to construct a duct of reasonable length with as few bends as possible. Scoops at the sides of the fuselage are often used. These side scoops are placed as far forward as possible to permit a gradual bend toward the compressor inlet, making the airflow characteristics approach those of a single-entrance duct. A series of turning vanes is sometimes placed in the side-scoop inlet to assist in straightening the incoming airflow and to prevent turbulence.


Figure 3-25. An example of a divided-entrance duct.

Figure 3-25. An example of a divided-entrance duct.

Variable-Geometry Duct

The main function of an inlet duct is to furnish the proper amount of air to the engine inlet. In a typical military aircraft using a turbojet or low bypass turbofan engine, the maximum airflow requirements are such that the Mach number of the airflow directly ahead of the face of the engine is less than Mach 1. Airflow through the engine must be less than Mach 1 at all times. Therefore, under all flight conditions, the velocity of the airflow as it enters the air-inlet duct must be reduced through the duct before the airflow is ready to enter the compressor. To accomplish this, inlet ducts are designed to function as diffusers, decreasing the velocity and increasing the static pressure of the air passing through them. [Figure 3-26]

Figure 3-26. An inlet duct acts as a diffuser to decrease the airflow velocity and to increase the static pressure of air.

Figure 3-26. An inlet duct acts as a diffuser to decrease the airflow velocity and to increase the static pressure of air.

As with military supersonic aircraft, a diffuser progressively decreases in area in the downstream direction. Therefore, a supersonic inlet duct follows this general configuration until the velocity of the incoming air is reduced to Mach 1. The aft section of the duct then increases in area, since this part must act as a subsonic diffuser. [Figure 3-27] In practice, inlet ducts for supersonic aircraft follows this general design only as much as practical, depending upon the design features of the aircraft. For very high speed aircraft, the inside area of configuration of the duct is changed by a mechanical device as the speed of the aircraft increases or decreases. A duct of this type is usually known as a variable-geometry inlet duct.

Figure 3-27. The aft section of an inlet duct acting as a subsonic diffuser.

Figure 3-27. The aft section of an inlet duct acting as a subsonic diffuser.

Military aircraft use the three methods described above to diffuse the inlet air and slow the inlet airflow at supersonic flight speeds. One is to vary the area, or geometry, of the inlet duct either by using a movable restriction, such as a ramp or wedge, inside the duct. Another system is some sort of a variable airflow bypass arrangement, which extracts part of the inlet airflow from the duct ahead of the engine. In some cases, a combination of both systems is used.

The third method is the use of a shock wave in the airstream. A shock wave is a thin region of discontinuity in a flow of air or gas, during which the speed, pressure, density, and temperature of the air or gas undergo a sudden change. Stronger shock waves produce larger changes in the properties of the air or gas. A shock wave is willfully set up in the supersonic flow of the air entering the duct, by means of some restriction or small obstruction which automatically protrudes into the duct at high flight Mach numbers. The shock wave results in diffusion of the airflow, which, in turn, decreases the velocity of the airflow. In at least one aircraft installation, both the shock method and the variable-geometry method of causing diffusion are used in combination. The same device that changes the area of the duct also sets up a shock wave that further reduces the speed of the incoming air within the duct. The amount of change in duct area and the magnitude of the shock are varied automatically with the airspeed of the aircraft.

Compressor Inlet Screens

To prevent the engine from readily ingesting any items that can be drawn in the intake, a compressor inlet screen is sometimes placed across the engine air inlet at some location along the inlet duct. Engines that incorporate inlet screens, such as turboprops [Figure 3-28] and APUs [Figure 3-29] are not as vulnerable to FOD. The advantages and disadvantages of a screen vary. If the engine is readily subjected to internal damage, as would be the case for an engine having an axial compressor fitted with aluminum compressor blades, an inlet screen is almost a necessity. Screens, however, add appreciably to inlet duct pressure loss and are very susceptible to icing. Failure due to fatigue is also a problem. A failed screen can sometimes cause more damage than no screen at all. In some instances, inlet screens are made retractable and may be withdrawn from the airstream after takeoff or whenever icing conditions prevail. Such screens are subject to mechanical failure and add both weight and bulk to the installation. In large turbofan engines having steel or titanium compressor (fan) blades, which do not damage easily, the disadvantages of compressor screens outweigh the advantages, so they are not generally used.

Figure 3-28. An example of a turboprop engine that incorporates inlet screens.

Figure 3-28. An example of a turboprop engine that incorporates inlet screens.

Figure 3-29. An example of an inlet screen on an APU.

Figure 3-29. An example of an inlet screen on an APU.