Reciprocating Engine Starting Systems (Part Three)

in Engine Starting Systems

Direct Cranking Electric Starting System for Small Aircraft

Most small, reciprocating engine aircraft employ a direct cranking electric starting system. Some of these systems are automatically engaged starting systems, while others are manually engaged.

Manually engaged starting systems used on many older, small aircraft employ a manually operated overrunning clutch drive pinion to transmit power from an electric starter motor to a crankshaft starter drive gear. [Figure 5-8] A knob or handle on the instrument panel is connected by a flexible control to a lever on the starter. This lever shifts the starter drive pinion into the engaged position and closes the starter switch contacts when the starter knob or handle is pulled.

Figure 5-8. Starter level controls and adjustment.

Figure 5-8. Starter level controls and adjustment.

The starter lever is attached to a return spring that returns the lever and the flexible control to the off position. When the engine starts, the overrunning action of the clutch protects the starter drive pinion until the shift lever can be released to disengage the pinion. For the typical unit, there is a specified length of travel for the starter gear pinion. [Figure 5-8] It is important that the starter lever move the starter pinion gear this proper distance before the adjustable lever stud contacts the starter switch.

The automatic, or remote solenoid engaged, starting systems employ an electric starter mounted on an engine adapter. A starter solenoid is activated by either a push button or turning the ignition key on the instrument panel. When the solenoid is activated, its contacts close and electrical energy energizes the starter motor. Initial rotation of the starter motor engages the starter through an overrunning clutch in the starter adapter, which incorporates worm reduction gears.

Figure 5-9. Starter adapter.

Figure 5-9. Starter adapter.

Some engines incorporate an automatic starting system that employs an electric starter motor mounted on a right angle drive adapter. As the starter motor is electrically energized, the adapter worm shaft and gear engage the starter shaft gear by means of a spring and clutch assembly. The shaft gear, in turn, rotates the crankshaft. When the engine begins to turn on its own power, the clutch spring disengages from the shaft gear. The starter adapter uses a worm drive gear shaft and worm gear to transfer torque from the starter motor to the clutch assembly. [Figure 5-9] As the worm gear rotates the worm wheel and clutch spring, the clutch spring is tightened around the drum of the starter shaft gear. As the shaft gear turns, torque is transmitted directly to the crankshaft gear.

Figure 5-10. Starter ring gear mounted on the propeller hub.

Figure 5-10. Starter ring gear mounted on the propeller hub.

Other engines use a starter that drives a ring gear mounted to the propeller hub. [Figure 5-10] It uses an electric motor and a drive gear that engages as the motor is energized and spins the gear, which moves out and engages the ring gear on the propeller hub cranking the engine for start. [Figure 5-11] As the engine starts, the starter drive gear is spun back by the engine turning, which disengages the drive gear. [Figure 5-12] The starter motors on small aircraft also have operational limits with cool down times that should be observed.

Figure 5-11. Starter drive gear mounting holes and electrical connector.

Figure 5-11. Starter drive gear mounting holes and electrical connector.

Figure 5-12. Engine starter mounted on the engine.

Figure 5-12. Engine starter mounted on the engine.

Reciprocating Engine Starting System Maintenance Practices

Most starting system maintenance practices include replacing the starter motor brushes and brush springs, cleaning dirty commutators, and turning down burned or out-of-round starter commutators. As a rule, starter brushes should be replaced when worn down to approximately one-half the original length. Brush spring tension should be sufficient to give brushes a good firm contact with the commutator. Brush leads should be unbroken and lead terminal screws tight.

A glazed or dirty starter commutator can be cleaned by holding a strip of double-0 sandpaper or a brush seating stone against the commutator as it is turned. The sandpaper or stone should be moved back and forth across the commutator to avoid wearing a groove. Emery paper or carborundum should never be used for this purpose because of their possible shorting action.

Roughness, out-of-roundness, or high-mica conditions are reasons for turning down the commutator. In the case of a high-mica condition, the mica should be undercut after the turning operation is accomplished. Refer to FAA-H-8083-30, Aviation Maintenance Technician—General for a review of high-mica commutators in motors.

The drive gear should be checked for wear along with the ring gear. The electrical connections should be checked for looseness and corrosion. Also, check the security of the mounting of the housing of the starter.

Troubleshooting Small Aircraft Starting Systems

The troubleshooting procedures listed in Figure 5-13 are typical of those used to isolate malfunctions in small aircraft starting systems.

Figure 5-13. Small aircraft troubleshooting procedures.

Figure 5-13. Small aircraft troubleshooting procedures. [Click image to enlarge]

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