Reciprocating Engine Ignition Systems

in Engine Ignition and Electrical Systems

The basic requirements for reciprocating engine ignition systems are similar, regardless of the type of engine. All ignition systems must deliver a high-tension spark across the electrodes of each spark plug in each cylinder of the engine in the correct firing order. At a predetermined number of degrees ahead of the top dead center position of the piston, as measured by crankshaft travel in degrees of rotation, the spark occurs in the cylinder. The potential output voltage of the system must be adequate to arc the gap in the spark plug electrodes under all operating conditions. The spark plug is threaded into the cylinder head with the electrodes exposed to the combustion area of the engine’s cylinder.

Ignition systems can be divided into two classifications: magneto-ignition systems or electronic Full Authority Digital Engine Control (FADEC) systems for reciprocating engines. Ignition systems can also be subclassified as either single or dual magneto-ignition systems. The single magneto-ignition system, usually consisting of one magneto and the necessary wiring, was used with another single magneto on the same engine. Dual magnetos generally use one rotating magnet that feeds two complete magnetos in one magneto housing. An example of each type is shown in Figure 4-1.

Figure 4-1. Single and dual magnetos.

Figure 4-1. Single and dual magnetos.

Aircraft magneto-ignition systems can be classified as either high-tension or low-tension. The low-tension magneto system, covered in a later section of this chapter, generates a low-voltage that is distributed to a transformer coil near each spark plug. This system eliminates some problems inherent in the high-tension system that was containing the high-voltage until it passed through the spark plug. The materials that were used for ignition leads could not withstand the high-voltage and were prone to leak to ground before the spark would get to the cylinder. As new materials evolved and shielding was developed, the problems with high-tension magnetos were overcome. The high-tension magneto system is still the most widely used aircraft ignition system.

Figure 4-2. Battery-ignition system.

Figure 4-2. Battery-ignition system.

Some very old antique aircraft used a battery-ignition system. In this system, the source of energy is a battery or generator, rather than a magneto. This system was similar to that used in most automobiles at the time. Figure 4-2 shows a simplified schematic of a battery-ignition system.

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