Radio Communication – Antennas

in Communication and Navigation

Antennas

As stated, antennas are conductors that are used to transmit and receive radio frequency waves. Although the airframe technician has limited duties in relation to maintaining and repairing avionics, it is the responsibility of the technician to install, inspect, repair, and maintain aircraft radio antennas.


Three characteristics are of major concern when considering antennas:

  1. Length
  2. Polarization
  3. Directivity

The exact shape and material from which an antenna is made can alter its transmitting and receiving characteristics. Also note that some non-metallic aircraft have antennas imbedded into the composite material as it is built up.

Length

When an AC signal is applied to an antenna, it has a certain frequency. There is a corresponding wavelength for that frequency. An antenna that is half the length of this wavelength is resonant. During each phase of the applied AC, all voltage and current values experience the full range of their variability. As a result, an antenna that is half the wavelength of the corresponding AC frequency is able to allow full voltage and full current flow for the positive phase of the AC signal in one direction. The negative phase of the full AC sign wave is accommodated by the voltage and current simply changing direction in the conductor. Thus, the applied AC frequency flows through its entire wavelength, first in one direction and then in the other. This produces the strongest signal to be radiated by the transmitting antenna. It also facilitates capture of the wave and maximum induced voltage in the receiving antenna. [Figure 11-87]

Figure 11-87. An antenna equal to the full length of the applied AC frequency wavelength would have the negative cycle current flow along the antenna as shown by the dotted line. An antenna that is ½ wavelength allows current to reverse its direction in the antenna during the negative cycle. This results in low current at the ends of the ½ wavelength antenna and high current in the center. As energy radiates into space, the field is strongest 90° to the antenna where the current flow is strongest.

Figure 11-87. An antenna equal to the full length of the applied AC frequency wavelength would have the negative cycle current flow along the antenna as shown by the dotted line. An antenna that is ½ wavelength allows current to reverse its direction in the antenna during the negative cycle. This results in low current at the ends of the ½ wavelength antenna and high current in the center. As energy radiates into space, the field is strongest 90° to the antenna where the current flow is strongest.

Most radios, especially communication radios, use the same antenna for transmitting and receiving. Multichannel radios could use a different length antenna for each frequency, however, this is impractical. Acceptable performance can exist from a single antenna half the wavelength of a median frequency. This antenna can be made effectively shorter by placing a properly rated capacitor in series with the transmission line from the transmitter or receiver. This electrically shortens the resonant circuit of which the antenna is a part. An antenna may be electrically lengthened by adding an inductor in the circuit. Adjusting antenna length in this fashion allows the use of a single antenna for multiple frequencies in a narrow frequency range.

Many radios use a tuning circuit to adjust the effective length of the antenna to match the wavelength of the desired frequency. It contains a variable capacitor and an inductor connected in parallel in a circuit. Newer radios use a more efficient tuning circuit. It uses switches to combine frequencies from crystal controlled circuits to create a resonant frequency that matches the desired frequency. Either way, the physical antenna length is a compromise when using a multichannel communication or navigation device that must be electronically tuned for the best performance.

A formula can be used to find the ideal length of a half wavelength antenna required for a particular frequency as follows:

The formula is derived from the speed of propagation of radio waves, which is approximately 300 million meters per second. It takes into account the dielectric effect of the air at the end of an antenna that effectively shortens the length of the conductor required.

VHF radio frequencies used by aircraft communication radios are 118–136.975 MHz. The corresponding half wavelengths of these frequencies are 3.96 – 3.44 feet (47.5–41.2 inches). Therefore, VHF antennas are relatively long. Antennas one-quarter of the wavelength of the transmitted frequency are often used. This is possible because when mounted on a metal fuselage, a ground plane is formed and the fuselage acts as the missing one-quarter length of the half wavelength antenna. This is further discussed in the following antenna types section.

Polarization, Directivity, and Field Pattern

Antennas are polarized. They radiate and receive in certain patterns and directions. The electric field cause by the voltage in the conductor is parallel to the polarization of an antenna. It is caused by the voltage difference between each end of the antenna. The electromagnetic field component of the radio wave is at 90° to the polarization. It is caused by changing current flow in the antenna. These fields were illustrated in Figure 11-76 and 11-77. As radio waves radiate out from the antenna they propagate in a specific direction and in a specific pattern. This is the antenna field. The orientation of the electric and electromagnetic fields remains at 90° to each other, but radiate from antenna with varying strength in different directions. The strength of the radiated field varies depending on the type of antenna and the angular proximity to it. All antennas, even those that are omnidirectional, radiate a stronger signal in some direction compared to other directions. This is known as the antenna field directivity.

Figure 11-76. Radio waves are produced by applying an AC signal to an antenna. This creates a magnetic and electric field around the antenna. They build and collapse as the AC cycles. The speed at which the AC cycles does not allow the fields to completely collapse before the next fields build. The collapsing fields are then forced out into space as radio waves.

Figure 11-76. Radio waves are produced by applying an AC signal to an antenna. This creates a magnetic and electric field around the antenna. They build and collapse as the AC cycles. The speed at which the AC cycles does not allow the fields to completely collapse before the next fields build. The collapsing fields are then forced out into space as radio waves. [click image to enlarge]

Figure 11-77. The electric field and the magnetic field of a radio wave are perpendicular to each other and to the direction of propagation of the wave.

Figure 11-77. The electric field and the magnetic field of a radio wave are perpendicular to each other and to the direction of propagation of the wave. [click image to enlarge]

Receiving antennas with the same polarization as the transmitting antenna generate the strongest signal. A vertically polarized antenna is mounted up and down. It radiates waves out from it in all directions. To receive the strongest signal from these waves, the receiving antenna should also be positioned vertically so the electromagnetic component of the radio wave can cross it at as close to a 90° angle as possible for most of the possible proximities. [Figure 11-88]
Figure 11-88. A vertically polarized antenna radiates radio waves in a donut-like pattern in all directions.

Figure 11-88. A vertically polarized antenna radiates radio waves in a donut-like pattern in all directions.

Horizontally polarized antennas are mounted side to side (horizontally). They radiate in a donut-like field. The strongest signals come from, or are received at, 90° to the length of the antenna. There is no field generated off of the end of the antenna. Figure 11-89 illustrates the field produced by a horizontally polarized antenna.

Figure 11-89. A horizontally polarized antenna radiates in a donut-like pattern. The strongest signal is at 90° to the length of the conductor.

Figure 11-89. A horizontally polarized antenna radiates in a donut-like pattern. The strongest signal is at 90° to the length of the conductor.

Many vertical and horizontal antennas on aircraft are mounted at a slight angle off plane. This allows the antenna to receive a weak signal rather than no signal at all when the polarization of the receiving antenna is not identical to the transmitting antenna. [Figure 11-90]

Figure 11-90. Many antenna are canted for better reception.

Figure 11-90. Many antenna are canted for better reception.