Structural Fasteners – Special Purpose Fasteners – Rivet Nuts and Blind Fasteners (Nonstructured)

Aircraft Metal Structural Repair

Rivet Nut The rivet nut is a blind installed, internally threaded rivet invented in 1936 by the Goodrich Rubber Company for the purpose of attaching a rubber aircraft wing deicer extrusion to the leading edge of the wing. The original rivet nut is the Rivnut® currently manufactured by Bollhoff Rivnut Inc. The Rivnut® became widely […]

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Structural Fasteners – Special Purpose Fasteners – Blind Bolts

Aircraft Metal Structural Repair

Blind Bolts Bolts are threaded fasteners that support loads through predrilled holes. Hex, close-tolerance, and internal wrenching bolts are used in aircraft structural applications. Blind bolts have a higher strength than blind rivets and are used for joints that require high strength. Sometimes, these bolts can be direct replacements for the Hi-Lok® and lockbolt. Many […]

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Structural Fasteners – Special Purpose Fasteners – Lockbolt Fastening Systems

Aircraft Metal Structural Repair

Lockbolt Fastening Systems Also pioneered in the 1940s, the lockbolt is a two-piece fastener that combines the features of a high strength bolt and a rivet with advantages over each. [Figure 4-106] In general, a lockbolt is a nonexpanding fastener that has either a collar swaged into annular locking groves on the pin shank or […]

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Structural Fasteners – Special Purpose Fasteners – Pin Fastening Systems (High-Shear Fasteners)

Aircraft Metal Structural Repair

Pin Fastening Systems (High-Shear Fasteners) A pin fastening system, or high-shear pin rivet, is a two-piece fastener that consists of a threaded pin and a collar. The metal collar is swaged onto the grooved end, effecting a firm tight fit. They are essentially threadless bolts. High-shear rivets are installed with standard bucking bars and pneumatic […]

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Structural Fasteners – Special Purpose Fasteners – Blind Rivets

Aircraft Metal Structural Repair

Special Purpose Fasteners Special purpose fasteners are designed for applications in which fastener strength, ease of installation, or temperature properties of the fastener require consideration. Solid shank rivets have been the preferred construction method for metal aircraft for many years because they fill up the hole, which results in good load transfer, but they are […]

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Structural Fasteners – Solid Shank Rivets – Removal and Replacement of Rivets

Aircraft Metal Structural Repair

Removal of Rivets When a rivet has to be replaced, remove it carefully to retain the rivet hole’s original size and shape. If removed correctly, the rivet does not need to be replaced with one of the next larger size. Also, if the rivet is not removed properly, the strength of the joint may be […]

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Structural Fasteners – Solid Shank Rivets – Evaluating the Rivet

Aircraft Metal Structural Repair

Evaluating the Rivet To obtain high structural efficiency in the manufacture and repair of aircraft, an inspection must be made of all rivets before the part is put in service. This inspection consists of examining both the shop and manufactured heads and the surrounding skin and structural parts for deformities. A scale or rivet gauge […]

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Structural Fasteners – Solid Shank Rivets – Riveting Procedure (Part Two)

Aircraft Metal Structural Repair

Countersinking Tools While there are many types of countersink tools, the most commonly used has an included angle of 100°. Sometimes types of 82° or 120° are used to form countersunk wells. [Figure 4-84] A six-fluted countersink works best in aluminum. There are also four- and three-fluted countersinks, but those are harder to control from a […]

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Structural Fasteners – Solid Shank Rivets – Riveting Procedure (Part One)

Aircraft Metal Structural Repair

Riveting Procedure The riveting procedure consists of transferring and preparing the hole, drilling, and driving the rivets. Hole Transfer Accomplish transfer of holes from a drilled part to another part by placing the second part over first and using established holes as a guide. Using an alternate method, scribe hole location through from drilled part […]

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