Identifying Wire and Cable – Powerplant Electrical Systems

in Engine Ignition and Electrical Systems

To aid in testing and repair operations, many maintenance activities mark wire or cable with a combination of letters and numbers that identify the wire, the circuit it belongs to, the gauge number, and other information necessary to relate the wire or cable to a wiring diagram. Such markings are the identification code.

There is no standard procedure for marking and identifying wiring; each manufacturer normally develops its own identification code. Figure 4-81 illustrates one identification system and shows the usual spacing in marking a wire. Some system components, especially plugs and jacks, are identified by a letter or group of letters and numbers added to the basic identification number. These letters and numbers may indicate the location of the component in the system. Interconnected cables are also marked in some systems to indicate location, proper termination, and use. In any system, the marking should be legible, and the stamping color should contrast with the color of the wire insulation. For example, use black stamping with light-colored backgrounds, or white stamping on dark-colored backgrounds.


Figure 4-81. Spacing of printed identification marks.

Figure 4-81. Spacing of printed identification marks.

Most manufacturers mark the wires at intervals of not more than 15 inches lengthwise and within 3 inches of each junction or terminating point. [Figure 4-82]

Figure 4-82. Wire identification at a terminal block.

Figure 4-82. Wire identification at a terminal block.

Coaxial cable and wires at terminal blocks and junction boxes are often identified by marking or stamping a wiring sleeve rather than the wire itself. For general purpose wiring, flexible vinyl sleeving, either clear or white opaque, is commonly used. For high-temperature applications, silicone rubber or silicone fiberglass sleeving is recommended. Where resistance to synthetic hydraulic fluids or other solvents is necessary, either clear or white opaque nylon sleeving can be used.

While the preferred method is to stamp the identification marking directly on the wire or on sleeving, other methods are often employed. One method uses a marked sleeve tied in place. The other uses a pressure-sensitive tape. [Figure 4-83]

Figure 4-83. Alternate methods of identifying wire bundles.

Figure 4-83. Alternate methods of identifying wire bundles.