Fundamentals of Electronics – Analog Electronics (Part Two)

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Semiconductors

The key to solid-state electronic devices is the electrical behavior of semiconductors. To understand semiconductors, a review of what makes a material an insulator or a conductor follows. Then, an explanation for how materials of limited conductivity are constructed and some of their many uses is explained. Semiconductor devices are the building blocks of modern electronics and avionics.


An atom of any material has a characteristic number of electrons orbiting the nucleus of the atom. The arrangement of the electrons occurs in somewhat orderly orbits called rings or shells. The closest shell to the nucleus can only contain two electrons. If the atom has more than two electrons, they are found in the next orbital shell away from the nucleus. This second shell can only hold eight electrons. If the atom has more than eight electrons, they orbit in a third shell farther out from the nucleus. This third shell is filled with eight electrons and then a fourth shell starts to fill if the element still has more electrons. However, when the fourth shell contains eight electrons, the number of electrons in the third shell begins to increase again until a maximum of 18 is reached. [Figure 11-13]

Figure 11-13. Maximum number of electrons in each orbital shell of an atom.

Figure 11-13. Maximum number of electrons in each orbital shell of an atom.

The outer most orbital shell of any atom’s electrons is called the valence shell. The number of electrons in the valence shell determines the chemical properties of the material. When the valence shell has the maximum number of electrons, it is complete and the electrons tend to be bound strongly to the nucleus. Materials with this characteristic are chemically stable. It takes a large amount of force to move the electrons in this situation from one atom valence shell to that of another. Since the movement of electrons is called electric current, substances with complete valence shells are known as good insulators because they resist the flow of electrons (electricity). [Figure 11-14]

Figure 11-14. Elements with full valence shells are good insulators. Most insulators used in aviation are compounds of two or more elements that share electrons to fill their valence shells.

Figure 11-14. Elements with full valence shells are good insulators. Most insulators used in aviation are compounds of two or more elements that share electrons to fill their valence shells.

In atoms with an incomplete valence shell, that is, those without the maximum number of electrons in their valence shell, the electrons are bound less strongly to the nucleus. The material is chemically disposed to combine with other materials or other identical atoms to fill in the unstable valence configuration and bring the number of electrons in the valence shell to maximum. Two or more substances may share the electrons in their valence shells and form a covalent bond. A covalent bond is the method by which atoms complete their valence shells by sharing valence electrons with other atoms.

Electrons in incomplete valence shells may also move freely from valence shell to valence shell of different atoms or compounds. In this case, these are known as free electrons. As stated, the movement of electrons is known as electric current or current flow. When electrons move freely from atom to atom or compound to compound, the substance is known as a conductor. [Figure 11-15]

Figure 11-15. The valence shells of elements that are common conductors have one (or three) electrons.

Figure 11-15. The valence shells of elements that are common conductors have one (or three) electrons.

Not all materials are pure elements, that is, substances made up of one kind of atom. Compounds occur when two or more different types of atoms combine. They create a new substance with different characteristics than any of the component elements. When compounds form, valence shells and their maximum number of electrons remain the rule of physics. The new compound molecule may either share electrons to fill the valence shell or free electrons may exist to make it a good conductor.

Silicon is an atomic element that contains four electrons in its valence shell. It tends to combine readily with itself and form a lattice of silicon atoms in which adjacent atoms share electrons to fill out the valance shell of each to the maximum of eight electrons. [Figure 11-16] This unique symmetric alignment of silicon atoms results in a crystalline structure.

Figure 11-16. The silicon atoms with just the valence shell electrons share these valence electrons with each other. By sharing with four other silicon atoms, the number of electrons in each silicon atom valence shell becomes eight, which is the maximum number. This makes the substance stable and it resists any flow of electrons.

Figure 11-16. The silicon atoms with just the valence shell electrons share these valence electrons with each other. By sharing with four other silicon atoms, the number of electrons in each silicon atom valence shell becomes eight, which is the maximum number. This makes the substance stable and it resists any flow of electrons.

Once bound together, the valence shells of each silicon atom are complete. In this state, movement of electrons does not occur easily. There are no free electrons to move to another atom and no space in the valence shells to accept a free electron. Therefore, silicon in this form is a good insulator.

Silicon is a primary material used in the manufacture of semiconductors. Germanium and a few other materials are also used.

Since silicon is an insulator, it must be modified to become a semiconductor. The process often used is called doping. Starting with ultra-pure silicon crystal, arsenic, phosphorus, or some other element with five valence electrons in each atom is mixed into the silicon. The result is a silicon lattice with flaws. [Figure 11-17] The elements bond, but numerous free electrons are present in the material from the 5th electron that is part of the valence shell of the doping element atoms. These free electrons can now flow under certain conditions. Thus, the silicon becomes semiconductive. The conditions required for electron flow in a semiconductor are discussed in the following paragraphs.

Figure 11-17. Silicon atoms doped with arsenic form a lattice work of covalent bonds. Free electrons exist in the material from the arsenic atom’s 5th valence electron. These are the electrons that flow when the semiconductor material, known as N-type or donor material, is conducting.

Figure 11-17. Silicon atoms doped with arsenic form a lattice work of covalent bonds. Free electrons exist in the material from the arsenic atom’s 5th valence electron. These are the electrons that flow when the semiconductor material, known as N-type or donor material, is conducting. [click image to enlarge]

When silicon is doped with an element or compound containing five electrons in its valence shell, the result is a negatively charged material due to the excess free electrons, and the fact that electrons are negatively charged. This is known as an N-type semiconductor material. It is also known as a donor material because, when it is used in electronics, it donates the extra electrons to current flow.

Doping silicon can also be performed with an element that has only three valence electrons, such as boron, gallium, or indium. Valence electron sharing still occurs, and the silicon atoms with interspersed doping element atoms form a lattice molecular structure. However, in this case, there are many valence shells where there are only seven electrons and not eight. This greatly changes the properties of the material. The absence of the electrons, called holes, encourages electron flow due to the preference to have eight electrons in all valence shells. Therefore, this type of doped silicon is also semiconductive. It is known as P-type material or as an acceptor since it accepts electrons in the holes under certain conditions. [Figure 11-18]

Figure 11-18. The lattice of boron doped silicon contains holes where the three boron valence shell electrons fail to fill in the combined valence shells to the maximum of eight electrons. This is known as P-type semiconductor material or acceptor material.

Figure 11-18. The lattice of boron doped silicon contains holes where the three boron valence shell electrons fail to fill in the combined valence shells to the maximum of eight electrons. This is known as P-type semiconductor material or acceptor material. [click image to enlarge]

Combining N- and P-type semiconductor material in certain ways can produce very useful results. A look at various semiconductor devices follows.

Semiconductor Diodes

A diode is an electrical device that allows current to flow in one direction through the device but not the other. A simple device that can be made from N- and P-type semiconductors is a semiconductor diode. When joined, the junction of these two materials exhibits unique properties. Since there are holes in the P-type material, free electrons from the N-type material are attracted to fill these holes. Once combined, the area at the junction of the two materials where this happens is said to be depleted. There are no longer free electrons or holes. However, having given up some electrons, the N-type material next to the junction becomes slightly positively charged, and having received electrons, the P-type material next to the junction becomes slightly negatively charged.

The depletion area at the junction of the two semiconductor materials constitutes a barrier or potential hill. The intensity of the potential hill is proportional to the width of the depletion area (where the electrons from the N-type material have filled holes in the P-type material). [Figure 11-19]

Figure 11-19. A potential hill.

Figure 11-19. A potential hill.

The two semiconductors joined in this manner form a diode that can be used in an electrical circuit. A voltage source is attached to the diode. When the negative terminal of the battery is attached to the N-type semiconductor material and the positive terminal is attached to the P-type material, electricity can flow in the circuit. The negative potential of the battery forces free electrons in the N-type material toward the junction. The positive potential of the battery forces holes in the P-type material toward the other side of the junction. The holes move by the rebinding of the doping agent ions closer to the junction. At the junction, free electrons continuously arrive and fill the holes in the lattice. As this occurs, more room is available for electrons and holes to move into the area. Pushed by the potential of the battery, electrons and holes continue to combine. The depletion area becomes extremely narrow under these conditions. The potential hill or barrier is, therefore, very small. The flow of current in the electrical circuit is in the direction of electron movement shown in Figure 11-20.

Figure 11-20. The flow of current and the P-N junction of a semiconductor diode attached to a battery in a circuit.

Figure 11-20. The flow of current and the P-N junction of a semiconductor diode attached to a battery in a circuit.

In similar circuits where the negative battery terminal is attached to the N-type semiconductor material and the positive terminal is attached to the P-type material, current flows from N-type, or donor material, to P-type receptor material. This is known as a forward biased semiconductor. A voltage of approximately 0.7 volts is needed to begin the current flow over the potential hill. Thereafter, current flow is linear with the voltage. However, temperature affects the ease at which electrons and holes combine given a specific voltage.

Figure 11-21. A reversed biased condition.

Figure 11-21. A reversed biased condition.

If the battery terminals are reversed, the semiconductor diode circuit is said to be reversed biased. [Figure 11-21] Attaching the negative terminal of the battery to the P-type material attracts the holes in the P-type material away from the junction in the diode. The positive battery terminal attached to the N-type material attracts the free electrons from the junction in the opposite direction. In this way, the width of the area of depletion at the junction of the two materials increases. The potential hill is greater. Current cannot climb the hill; therefore, no current flows in the circuit. The semiconductors do not conduct.

Figure 11-22. A semiconductor diode acts as a check valve in an AC circuit resulting in a pulsating DC output.

Figure 11-22. A semiconductor diode acts as a check valve in an AC circuit resulting in a pulsating DC output.

Semiconductor diodes are used often in electronic circuits. When AC current is applied to a semiconductor diode, current flows during one cycle of the AC but not during the other cycle. The diode, therefore, becomes a rectifier. When it is forward biased, electrons flow; when the AC cycles, electrons do not flow. A simple AC rectifier circuit containing a semiconductor diode and a load resistor is illustrated in Figure 11- 22. Semiconductor diode symbols and examples of semiconductor diodes are shown in Figure 11-23.

Figure 11-23. Symbols and drawings of semiconductor diodes.

Figure 11-23. Symbols and drawings of semiconductor diodes.

NOTE: Electron flow is typically discussed in this text. The conventional current flow concept where electricity is thought to flow from the positive terminal of the battery through a circuit to the negative terminal is sometimes used in the field.

Semiconductor diodes have limitations. They are rated for a range of current flow. Above a certain level, the diode overheats and burns up. The amount of current that passes through the diode when forward biased is directly proportional to the amount of voltage applied. But, as mentioned, it is affected by temperature.

Figure 11-24. A semiconductor diode.

Figure 11-24. A semiconductor diode.

Figure 11-24 indicates the actual behavior of a semiconductor diode. In practice, a small amount of current does flow through a semiconductor diode when reversed biased. This is known as leakage current and it is in the micro amperage range. However, at a certain voltage, the blockage of current flow in a reversed biased diode breaks down completely. This voltage is known as the avalanche voltage because the diode can no longer hold back the current and the diode fails.