Fundamentals of Electronics – Analog Electronics (Part One)

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Fundamentals of Electronics
Analog Versus Digital Electronics

Electronic devices represent and manipulate real world phenomenon through the use of electrical signals. Electronic circuits are designed to perform a wide array of manipulations. Analog representations are continuous. Some aspect of an electric signal is modified proportionally to the real world item that is being represented. For example, a microphone has electricity flowing through it that is altered when sound is applied. The type and strength of the modification to the electric signal is characteristic of the sound that is made into the microphone. The result is that sound, a real world phenomenon, is represented electronically. It can then be moved, amplified, and reconverted from an electrical signal back into sound and broadcast from a speaker across the room or across the globe.


Since the flow of electricity through the microphone is continuous, the sound continuously modifies the electric signal. On an oscilloscope, an analog signal is a continuous curve. [Figure 11-3] An analog electric signal can be modified by changing the signal’s amplitude, frequency, or phase.

Figure 11-3. An analog signal displayed on an oscilloscope is a continuous curve.

Figure 11-3. An analog signal displayed on an oscilloscope is a continuous curve.

A digital electronic representation of a real world event is discontinuous. The essential characteristics of the continuous event are captured as a series of discrete incremental values. Electronically, these representative samplings are successive chains of voltage and non-voltage signals. They can be transported and manipulated in electronic circuits. When the samples are sufficiently small and occur with high frequency, real world phenomenon can be represented to appear continuous.

Noise

A significant advantage of digital electronics over analog electronics is the control of noise. Noise is any alteration of the represented real world phenomenon that is not intended or desired. Consider the operation of a microphone when understanding noise. A continuous analog voltage is modified by a voice signal that results in the continuous voltage varying in proportion to the volume and tone of the input sound. However, the voltage responds and modifies to any input. Thus, background sounds also modify the continuous voltage as will electrostatic activity and circuitry imperfections. This alteration by phenomenon that are not the intended modifier is noise.

During the processing of digitized data, there is little or no signal degradation. The real world phenomenon is represented in a string of binary code. A series of ones and zeros are electronically created as a sequence of voltage or no voltage and carried through processing stages. It is relatively immune to outside alteration once established. If a signal is close to the set value of the voltage, it is considered to be that voltage. If the signal is close to zero, it is considered to be no voltage. Small variations or modifications from undesired phenomenon are ignored. Figure 11-4 illustrates an analog sine wave and a digital sine wave. Any unwanted voltage will modify the analog curve. The digital steps are not modified by small foreign inputs. There is either voltage or no voltage.

Figure 11-4. Analog signals are continuous voltage modified by all external events including those that are not desired called noise. Digital signals are a series of voltage or no voltage that represent a desired event.

Figure 11-4. Analog signals are continuous voltage modified by all external events including those that are not desired called noise. Digital signals are a series of voltage or no voltage that represent a desired event.

Analog Electronics

Early aircraft were equipped with radio communication and navigational devices that were constructed with analog electronic circuits. They used vacuum tubes that functioned as electron control valves. These were later replaced by solidstate devices. Today, digital electronic circuits dominate modern avionics. A brief look at various electron control valves used on aircraft follows.

Electron Control Valves

Electron control valves are an essential part of an electronic circuit. Control of electron flow enables the circuit to produce the desired outcome. Early aircraft made use of vacuum tubes to control electron flow. Later, transistors replaced vacuum tubes. Semiconductors used in transistors and integrated circuits have enabled the solid-state digital electronics found in aircraft today.

Vacuum Tubes

Electron control valves found in the analog circuits of early aircraft electronics are constructed of vacuum tubes. Only antique aircraft retain radios with these devices due to their size and inability to withstand the harsh vibration and shock of the aircraft operating environment. However, they do function, and a description is included here as a foundation for the study of more modern electronic circuits and components.

Figure 11-5. A vacuum tube diode contains a cathode, heater, and plate. Note that the arrow formed in the symbol for the heater points to the direction of electron flow.

Figure 11-5. A vacuum tube diode contains a cathode, heater, and plate. Note that the arrow formed in the symbol for the heater points to the direction of electron flow.

Diodes

A diode acts as a check valve in an alternating current (AC) circuit. It allows current to flow during half of the AC cycle but not the other half. In this manner, it creates a pulsating direct current (DC) with current that drops to zero in between pulses. A diode tube has two active electrodes: the cathode and the plate. It also contains a heater. All of this is housed in a vacuum environment inside the tube. [Figure 11-5] The heater glows red hot while heating the cathode. The cathode is coated with a material whose electrons are excited by the heat. The excited electrons expand their orbit when heated. They move close enough to the plate, which is constructed around the cathode and heater arrangement, that they are attracted to the positively-charged plate. When the AC current cycles, the plate becomes negatively charged and the excited cathode electrons do not flow to the plate. In a circuit, this causes a check valve effect that allows current to only flow in one direction, which is the definition of a diode. [Figure 11-6] The various symbols used to depict diodes are shown in Figure 11-7.

Figure 11-6. A vacuum tube diode in a circuit allows current to flow in one direction only. The output waveform illustrates the lack of current flow as the AC cycles.

Figure 11-6. A vacuum tube diode in a circuit allows current to flow in one direction only. The output waveform illustrates the lack of current flow as the AC cycles.

Figure 11-7. Diode symbols.

Figure 11-7. Diode symbols.

Triodes

A triode is an electron control valve containing three elements. It is often used to control a large amount of current with a smaller current flow. In addition to the cathode, plate, and heater present in the diode, a triode also contains a grid. The grid is composed of fine wire spiraled between the cathode and the plate but closer to the cathode. Applying voltage to the grid can influence the cathode’s electrons, which normally flow to the plate when the cathode is heated. Changes in the relatively small amount of current that flows through the grid can greatly impact the flow of electrons from the cathode to the plate. [Figure 11-8]

Figure 11-8. A triode has three elements: the cathode, plate, and a grid.

Figure 11-8. A triode has three elements: the cathode, plate, and a grid.

Figure 11-9 illustrates a triode in a simple circuit. AC voltage input is applied to the grid. A high-resistance resistor is used so that only minimum voltage passes through to the grid. As this small AC input voltage varies, the amount of DC output in the cathode-plate circuit also varies. When the input signal is positive, the grid is positive. This aids in drawing electrons from the cathode to the plate. However, when the AC input signal cycles to negative, the grid becomes negatively charged and flow from the cathode to the plate is cut off with the help of the negatively charged grid that repels the electrons on the cathode.

Figure 11-9. Varying AC input voltage to the grid circuit in a triode produces a varying DC output.

Figure 11-9. Varying AC input voltage to the grid circuit in a triode produces a varying DC output.

Tetrodes

A tetrode vacuum tube electron control valve has four elements. In addition to the cathode, plate, and grid found in a tridode, a tetrode also contains a screen grid. The cathode and plate of a vacuum tube electron control valve can act as a capacitor. At high frequencies, the capacitance is so low that feedback occurs. The output in the plate circuit feeds back into the control grid circuit. This causes an oscillation generating AC voltage that is unwanted. By placing a screen grid between the anode and the control grid windings, this feedback and the inter-electrode capacitive effect of the anode and cathode are neutralized. [Figure 11-10]

Figure 11-10. A tetrode is a four element electron control valve vacuum tube including a cathode, a plate, a control grid, and a screen grid.

Figure 11-10. A tetrode is a four element electron control valve vacuum tube including a cathode, a plate, a control grid, and a screen grid.

Figure 11-11 illustrates a tetrode in a circuit. The screen grid is powered by positive DC voltage. The inter-electrode capacitance is now between the screen grid and the plate. A capacitor is located between the screen grid and ground. AC feedback generated in the screen grid goes to ground and does not oscillate. This allows use of the tetrode at higher frequencies than a triode.

Figure 11-11. To enable a triode to be used at high frequencies, a screen grid is constructed between the plate and the control grid.

Figure 11-11. To enable a triode to be used at high frequencies, a
screen grid is constructed between the plate and the control grid.

Pentodes

The plate in a vacuum tube can have a secondary emission that must be controlled. When electrons flow from the cathode through the control grid and screen grid to the plate, they can arrive at such high velocity that some bounce off. Therefore, the tendency is for those electrons to be attracted to the positively charged screen grid. The screen grid is not capable of handling large amounts of current without burning up. To solve this problem, a third grid is constructed between the plate and the screen grid. Called a suppression grid, it is charged negatively so that secondary electron flow from the plate is repelled by the negative charge back toward the plate and is not allowed to reach the screen grid. The five element pentode is especially useful in high power circuits where secondary emissions from the plate are high. [Figure 11-12]

Figure 11-12. A pentode contains a suppression grid that controls secondary electron emissions from the plate at high power. This keeps the current in the screen grid from becoming too high.

Figure 11-12. A pentode contains a suppression grid that controls secondary electron emissions from the plate at high power. This keeps the current in the screen grid from becoming too high.

Solid-State Devices

Solid-state devices began replacing vacuum tube electron control valves in the late 1950s. Their long life, reliability, and resilience in harsh environments make them ideal for use in avionics.