Float-Type Carburetors – Idling System

in Engine Fuel and Fuel Metering Systems

With the throttle valve closed at idling speeds, air velocity through the venturi is so low that it cannot draw enough fuel from the main discharge nozzle; in fact, the spray of fuel may stop altogether. However, low pressure (piston suction) exists on the engine side of the throttle valve. In order to allow the engine to idle, a fuel passageway is incorporated to discharge fuel from an opening in the low pressure area near the edge of the throttle valve. [Figure 2-14] This opening is called the idling jet. With the throttle open enough so that the main discharge nozzle is operating, fuel does not flow out of the idling jet. As soon as the throttle is closed far enough to stop the spray from the main discharge nozzle, fuel flows out the idling jet. A separate air bleed, known as the idle air bleed, is included as part of the idling system. It functions in the same manner as the main air bleed. An idle mixture adjusting device is also incorporated. A typical idling system is illustrated in Figure 2-15.

Figure 2-14. Throttle action in idle position.

Figure 2-14. Throttle action in idle position.

Figure 2-15. Idling system.

Figure 2-15. Idling system.