Float-Type Carburetors – Economizer System

in Engine Fuel and Fuel Metering Systems

For an engine to develop maximum power at full throttle, the fuel mixture must be richer than for cruise. The additional fuel is used for cooling the engine combustion chambers to prevent detonation. An economizer is essentially a valve that is closed at throttle settings below approximately 60–70 percent of rated power. This system, like the accelerating system, is operated by the throttle control.

Figure 2-20. A needle-valve type economizer system.

Figure 2-20. A needle-valve type economizer system.


A typical economizer system consists of a needle valve which begins to open when the throttle valve reaches a predetermined point near the wide-open position. [Figure 2-20] As the throttle continues to open, the needle valve is opened further and additional fuel flows through it. This additional fuel supplements the flow from the main metering jet direct to the main discharge nozzle.

Figure 2-21. A pressure operated economizer system.

Figure 2-21. A pressure operated economizer system.

A pressure-operated economizer system is shown in Figure 2-21. This type has a sealed bellows located in an enclosed compartment. The compartment is vented to engine manifold pressure. When the manifold pressure reaches a certain value, the bellows is compressed and opens a valve in a carburetor fuel passage, supplementing the normal quantity of fuel being discharged through the main nozzle.

Figure 2-22. Pressure-type carburetor.

Figure 2-22. Pressure-type carburetor.

Another type of economizer is the back-suction system. [Figure 2-22] Fuel economy in cruising is provided by reducing the effective pressure acting on the fuel level in the float compartment. With the throttle valve in cruising position, suction is applied to the float chamber through an economizer hole and back-suction economizer channel and jet. The suction applied to the float chamber opposes the nozzle suction applied by the venturi. Fuel flow is reduced, leaning the mixture for cruising economy.

Another type of mixture control system uses a metering valve that is free to rotate in a stationary metering sleeve. Fuel enters the main and idling systems through a slot cut in the mixture sleeve. Fuel metering is accomplished by the relative position between one edge of the slot in the hollow metering valve and one edge of the slot in the metering sleeve. Moving the mixture control to reduce the size of the slot provides a leaner mixture for altitude compensation.