Aircraft Rigging – Biplane Assembly and Rigging

in Aerodynamics, Aircraft Assembly, and Rigging

Biplane Assembly and Rigging

Biplanes were some of the very first aircraft designs. The first powered heavier-than-air aircraft, the Wright brothers’ Wright Flyer, successfully flown on December 17, 1903, was a biplane.


The first biplanes were designed with very thin wing sections and, consequently, the wing structure needed to be strengthened by external bracing wires. The biplane configuration allowed the two wings to be braced against one another, increasing the structural strength. When the assembly and rigging of a biplane is accomplished in accordance with the approved instructions, a stable airworthy aircraft is the result.

Whether assembling an early model vintage aircraft that may have been disassembled for repair and restoration, or constructing and assembling a new aircraft, the following are some basic alignment procedures to follow.

To start, the fuselage must be level, fore and aft and laterally. The aircraft usually has specific leveling points designated by the manufacturer or indicated on the plans. The fuselage should be blocked up off the landing gear so it is stable. A center line should be drawn on the floor the length of the fuselage and another line perpendicular to it at the firewall, for use as an additional alignment reference.

With the horizontal and vertical tail surfaces installed, the incident angle for the horizontal stabilizer should be set. The tail brace wires should be connected and tightened until the slack is removed. Alignment measurements should be checked as shown in Figure 2-96.

Figure 2-96. Checking aircraft symmetry.

Figure 2-96. Checking aircraft symmetry.

Install the elevator and rudder and clamp them in a neutral position. Verify the neutral position of the control stick and rudder pedals in the flight deck and secure them in order to simplify the connecting and final tensioning of the control cables.

Figure 2-97. Center section alignment.

Figure 2-97. Center section alignment.

If the biplane has a center section for the upper wing, it must be aligned as accurately as possible, because even the smallest error is compounded at the wing tip. Applicable cables and turnbuckles should be connected and the tension set as specified. [Figure 2-97] The stagger measurement can be checked as shown in Figure 2-98.

Figure 2-98. Measuring stagger.

Figure 2-98. Measuring stagger.

The lower wing sections should be individually attached to the fuselage and blocked up for support while the landing

wires are connected and adjusted to obtain the dihedral called for in the specifications or plans. [Figure 2-99]

Figure 2-99. Measuring dihedral.

Figure 2-99. Measuring dihedral.

Next, connect the outer “N” struts to the left and right sections of the lower wing. Now, the upper wing can be attached and the flying wires installed. The slave struts can be installed and the ailerons connected using the same alignment and adjustment procedures used for the elevator and rudder. The incidence angle can be checked, as shown in Figure 2-100.

Figure 2-100. Checking incidence.

Figure 2-100. Checking incidence.

Once this point is reached, it is a matter of measuring, checking angles, and adjusting the various components to obtain the overall aircraft symmetry and desired alignment, as shown in Figure 2-96.

Figure 2-96. Checking aircraft symmetry.

Figure 2-96. Checking aircraft symmetry.

Also, remember that care should be used when tightening the wing wires because extra stress can be inadvertently induced into the wings. Always loosen one wire before tightening the opposite wire. Flying and landing wires are typically set at about 600 pounds and tail brace wires at about 300 pounds of tension.

When convinced the aircraft is properly rigged, move away from it and take a good look at the finished product. Are the wings symmetrical? Does the dihedral look even? Is the tail section square with the fuselage? Are the wing attaching hardware, flying wires, and control cables safetied? And the final task, before the first flight, is to complete the maintenance record entries.

As with any aircraft maintenance or repair, the instructions and specifications from the manufacturer, or the procedures and recommendations found in the construction plans, should be the primary method to perform the assembly and rigging of the aircraft.