Basic Carburetor Induction System

in Induction and Exhaust Systems

Figure 3-2 is a diagram of an induction system used in an engine equipped with a carburetor. In this induction system, carburetor normal flow air is admitted at the lower front nose cowling below the propeller spinner, and is passed through an air filter into air ducts leading to the carburetor. A carburetor heat air valve is located below the carburetor for selecting an alternate warm air source (carburetor heat) to prevent carburetor icing. [Figure 3-5] Carburetor icing occurs when the temperature is lowered in the throat of the carburetor and enough moisture is present to freeze and block the flow of air to the engine. The carburetor heat valve admits air from the outside air scoop for normal operation, and it admits warm air from the engine compartment for operation during icing conditions. The carburetor heat is operated by a push-pull control in the cockpit. When the carburetor heat air door is closed, warm ducted air from around the exhaust is directed into the carburetor. This raises the intake air temperature. An alternate air door can be opened by engine suction if the normal route of airflow should be blocked by something. The valve is spring loaded closed and is sucked open by the engine if needed.

Figure 3-2. Nonsupercharged induction system using a carburetor.

Figure 3-2. Nonsupercharged induction system using a carburetor.

Figure 3-5. Location of a carburetor heat air valve.

Figure 3-5. Location of a carburetor heat air valve.


The carburetor air filter, shown in Figure 3-6, is installed in the air scoop in front of the carburetor air duct. Its purpose is to stop dust and other foreign matter from entering the engine through the carburetor. The screen consists of an aluminum alloy frame and a deeply crimped screen, arranged to present maximum screen area to the airstream. There are several types of air filters in use including paper, foam, and other types of filters. Most air filters require servicing at regular intervals and the specific instructions for the type of filter must be followed. [Figure 3-6]

Figure 3-6. Location of air filter.

Figure 3-6. Location of air filter.

The carburetor air ducts consist of a fixed duct riveted to the nose cowling and a flexible duct between the fixed duct and the carburetor air valve housing. The carburetor air ducts normally provide a passage for outside air to the carburetor. Air enters the system through the ram-air intake. The intake opening is located in the slipstream so the air is forced into the induction system giving a ram effect to the incoming airflow. The air passes through the air ducts to the carburetor. The carburetor meters the fuel in proportion to the air and mixes the air with the correct amount of fuel. The throttle plate of the carburetor can be controlled from the cockpit to regulate the flow of air (manifold pressure), and in this way, power output of the engine can be controlled.

Although many newer aircraft are not so-equipped, some engines are equipped with carburetor air temperature indicating systems which shows the temperature of the air at the carburetor inlet. If the bulb is located at the engine side of the carburetor, the system measures the temperature of the fuel/air mixture.